3D Printing Bobbins/Formers for Coils

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Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

My Friends,

An Experiment today, I hope it works out!

Coil Formers or Coil Bobbins are one of the hardest things to come by! In the past I have made them from CNC Cut Plexi Glass, or Acrylic Plastic:

Ref: CNC Machine

This process is expensive and wasteful!

I have designed a Coil Former/Bobbin in FreeCAD and have basic dimensions set:

 

I am new at this, so I believe I may need Supports to help this turn out ok. With all experiments, the process will be perfected over time.

What I use:

  1. FreeCAD - Free CAD Design Software with hundreds of Videos on YouTube.
  2. Ultimaker Cura - Free also excellent for 3D Printing, does all the Splicing and so on.
  3. Ender 3 Pro an excellent and very cheap 3D Printer, I paid $260 for mine.

 

 

Very easy to put together!

Supports seem fairly easy, here is a good video:

 

I will update you asap with the result!

Best wishes,

   Chris

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thaelin posted this 4 weeks ago

They are great to play with. I have a CrS10 and a Imac running Cura. My problem is how to use Cad. It has been a stumbling block with me. I can do it on paper all day long. In cad, I get just about every error you can think of.   Getting ready to upgrade to PetG fillament as it is better and doesn't fall apart with moisture.

Look forward to your progress.

thay

Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

Hey Thaelin,

I am very fond of FreeCAD, tons of really good Tutorial Videos:

 

I posted a Thread: FreeCAD CAD Design Software, to help.

Thanks, and yes, will be interesting to see the result. I am using PLA at the moment, its all I have for now but will look at options soon.

Best wishes,

   Chris

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raivope posted this 4 weeks ago

Hi,

I used OpenSCAD to print out Coil Formers in two pieces. Then you do not need any supports. Put those together and use soldering-iron or glue to connect pieces.

OpenSCAD has a very interesting programming language

Simplified example code below, just paste into OpenSCAD and press F5/run.

Raivo

$fn = 100;

// core parameters AMCC-0125

xyz = [19.4 + .6, 35 + .7, 121/2]; // length, depth, height
coil_length = 24;
side_thickness = 2.5;
bottom_size_extra = 8;
sleeve_thickness = 1.6;


mainItem(coil_length);


module mainItem(h) {
  // bottom
  translate([0, 0, -side_thickness])
  to3D(side_thickness) {
    bottom2D();
  }

  // top
  toSleeve(thickness=sleeve_thickness, h = h) {
    do2D();
  }
}


module bottom2D() {
  difference() {
    fillet(r=9) {
      square([xyz[0]+bottom_size_extra*2, xyz[1]+bottom_size_extra*2], center=true);
    }
    do2D();
  }
}

module do2D() {
  square([xyz[0],xyz[1]], center=true);
}


/* powerful helper methods */
module to3D(h = 60) {
  linear_extrude(height = h, twist = 0) {
    children();
  }
}

module fillet(r) {
  offset(r = r) {
    offset(delta = -r) {
      children();
    }
  }
}

module toSleeve(thickness = 1.2, h = 60) {
  to3D(h) {
    difference() {
      offset(r = thickness) {
        children();
      }
      children();
    }
  }
}

 

 

thaelin posted this 4 weeks ago

Rav:

   How do you make it to an .stl file which is what my software needs?

 

thay

 

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Wistiti posted this 4 weeks ago

Nice tread! I also have the Ender3 (not pro) and love it.

As Thay said petg is more resistant than pla and less harmful vapor then abs...

Will be nice to share some .stl files.

I will look to free cad until now I have not create a piece, i have just replicate some from thingivers and other site.

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Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

My Friends,

I have shrunk down the Bobbin size down, and started to slice a Low Quality version of the Coil Bobbin/Former for testing.

Here is the model in Cura:

 

The stripy yellow/brown is the supports. I am running a test print now, 36grams of filament and 3 hrs and 34 minutes is the estimated time.

Here is the start:

 

Not real nice, few little issues there. I think the Bed is too Hot, some lift. I should have a result in the next few hours.

EDIT: A short video:

 

This is my first 3D Design and 3D Print, it is my 3rd 3D Print. I hope this is helpful for others!

Best wishes,

   Chris

 

P.S: Thaelin, I use File -> Export and export the file to a type that's supported. Currently I am using: *.amf file and its working well so far:

 

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Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

My Friends,

Almost 2hrs into the print, the job failed. I had a few problems.

You can see, I had a large build up of Plastic on one edge. This had knocked the job off the Bed which was not very well stuck down as it was. I have printed this 3D Print with Cura Default settings for Low Quality:

 

I think with some fiddling and some better monitoring, pausing the job to clean the end of the nozzle from gunk, should help! In saying this, I am very happy with the end result:

 

Also, what I have done is offset the Center Wall, by 1mm, so it is inside the Top and Bottom Plate:

 

Notice in above images, and again here on the right hand side, we had a visible Wall line on the Top Plate:

 

In the Bottom Plate, that was stuck to the Bed, this is the outline seen:

 

A complete job, with slightly better Quality, will be more than sufficient for a Coil Former! Plenty strong enough and plenty flexible enough to easily modify the size and characteristic for the purpose needed!

A successful experiment, even though we have a failed Print job.

Best wishes,

   Chris

 

raivope posted this 4 weeks ago

Rav:

   How do you make it to an .stl file which is what my software needs?

 

thay

 

In OpenSCAD - just press STL button (F7). In this sequence F5 (run, fast), F6 (render), F7 (save STL)

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Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

My Friends,

Some extra help videos:

 

This option should be a no brainer:

 

In the newer version of Cura, you need to go into: 

 

Preferences:

 

Into Shell:

 

Down to:

 

Optimize Wall Printing Order:

 

Now you should have the option, in Cura, to tick and untick the option as you need to! Like this:

 

This could dramatically speed up Prints by minimising the travel of the Steppers during the job!

 

Lots of tips and tricks to make for better 3D Printing!

   Chris

Munny posted this 4 weeks ago

Oh dear, this is kind of deju vu for me.  Years ago I listened to people tell me about 3D-printing, do this, get that, etc...   I kept asking folks, "Is there a printer that is as reliable and as accurate as quality woodworking tools?"  The answer was, yes, there is, but it won't be cheap.  If you want a toy 3D-printer, there are plenty of choices and you'll spend lots of hours getting it to do what you really want it to do, if it even can.  I made a choice to get a quality product that works every single time--no failed prints.  Draw-up what you want, print it, then use it.  It really depends on whether you want a new hobby or not.  If you don't want a new hobby, but instead a tool to get the job done, you can do as I did:

Fusion 360

Zortrax 3D Printers

 

I print a lot of bobbins and if I draw-up the dimensions correctly, they always work.  Gives me more time to build real devices and learn about something that really matters.  wink

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Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

Hey Munny,

For my First Design, and Third print, I am more than happy! The Ender 3 Pro is way more than satisfactory for my needs, I am very happy with it! Especially for the price!

The printer can print superb quality, my first two prints, others design, were first class!

 

I am super surprised by the intricate detail!

I am more than happy with the printer, my learning curve is what I am not happy with yet, soon, I will be able to avoid silly problems like I saw with the Coil Former Experiment.

Experience counts with everything we do! We get better at what we do with experience!

Best wishes,

   Chris

H2opower posted this 4 weeks ago

This is an area where I too am moving towards printing my own bobbins as the ones shown here have about a six month turnaround from the time I design them to the time I can hold them in my hands.

These are the inner and outer bobbins for the transformers I make for the voltage intensifier circuit and with such a long turn around time it hinders me from doing things quickly when changes are needed to be made to the design through testing and learning what works best and what does not. The cost of making these at the local machine shop is really high something like $1250 for the inner bobbin and $1400 for the outter bobbin. This cost is far higher than the machine I am getting ready to buy that will allow me to make these bobbin on my own with a drastic cut in turnaround time from design to actually holding the part in my hands.

For my designs I need something with a lot more detail and precision than these filament types of 3D printers are capable of so I will be going with the SLA/MSLA type 3D printers. 

I must have smooth edges as if you rub off the protective coating of the wires while winding the transformer up the transformer will fail at the voltage levels they are required to run at in the voltage intensifier circuit. Then afterword's I have to vacuum resin seal the transformers to get all of the air out and keep the wires from vibrating as those two potential problems will shorten the transformer's life if they are not sealed by a resin to prevent them from killing the transformer. Me vacuum sealing the transformer: 

Sure the cost is a little more but when you factor in the risk of chaffing the wire's protective coating and then having the transformer fail as a result then paying a little more for the bobbins seems small in comparison as once they are vacuum sealed they are throwaway items as you can't recover much of anything after that. With these transformers everything has to be as close to perfect as you can get them as there are no do overs once made as you have to make a new one. 

thaelin posted this 3 weeks ago

A few days late and a dollar short but Ravi, thanks for that short snippet of program for Cad. I installed Scad and played with the program a bit and found I can make it work for my cores. Cant thank you enough for it. Getting a set of .stl files to print now. Will be winding them soon. Exciting times ahead. Can finally start to work with a core/coil set that is like what is shown.

These 12hr days tho do really get in the way of things so not sure how long I will be. Will be adding to the fray here as things happen.

again thanks.

 

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