Google’s Growing trouble because of its arrogance

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Chris posted this 18 August 2020

My Friends,

This is massive and needs to be taken special note of:

Google has hit back at claims the tech giant is spreading “misinformation” in its open letter to users.

Google has hit back at Australia’s competition watchdog today after ACCC chairman Rod Sims criticised the company for spreading “misinformation” in its open letter to users.

Despite Google claiming Australian services were “at risk,” Mr Sims said the tech giant would not be “required to charge Australians for the use of its free services” under the proposed news bargaining code.

A Google spokesman appeared to rule out charging users today, instead claiming the code would “seriously damage our products and user experience”.

“We do not intend to charge users for our free services,” he said. “What we did say is that Search and YouTube, both of which are free services, are at risk in Australia. That’s because the code as it is drafted is unworkable.”

 

Google has sent “warnings” to millions of Australians in what looks like to start of a fierce campaign against new rules that could force it to pay for news content. Picture: Supplied
Google has sent “warnings” to millions of Australians in what looks like to start of a fierce campaign against new rules that could force it to pay for news content.

He said Google was concerned it would have to give registered news organisations advance warning of changes affecting their content, and to share data about how users interacted with news stories.

“This goes beyond the current level of data-sharing between Google and news publishers,” he said.

The draft code, released on July 31, asks digital platforms to provide “clear information about the data they collect” about users’ interactions with news stories, in a move designed to assist smaller publishers which may not be aware of the data collection.

GOOGLE’S AUSSIE THREAT BLASTED

It comes as the tech giant is sends “warnings” to millions of Australians this week in what looks like the start of a fierce campaign against new rules that could force the firm to pay for the news it uses on its platform.

 

And the trillion-dollar company is making bold claims to users: alleging proposed laws from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will put everything from users’ privacy to the viability of Google’s free services at risk.

But ACCC chairman Rod Sims branded some of these warnings as “misinformation”.

We put these claims to the test against the draft legislation, and this is what you need to know about Google’s new “open letter” and what a news code would really mean for everyone.

Communications Minister Paul Fletcher has also blasted Google.

“One of the things that struck me was this item that pops up when you do a google search refers to the ‘big media’ companies,” he told Sky News host Peter Stefanovic on Tuesday.

“Now let’s get some numbers in this debate. Google has a market capitalisation of 1200 billion US dollars.

“The market capitalisation of News Corp – the biggest of the Australian news businesses – is $US9 billion. Nine Entertainment Ltd is $US2 billion.

“This language which attempts to characterise one side of this policy interaction as ‘big businesses’ – and by implication the other side not a big business, let’s be clear this is about the proper commercial terms for dealings between news media businesses.”

CLAIM: The ACCC news code could “put the free services you use at risk in Australia”.

FACT: Only Google can set the price of its products and services in Australia and elsewhere.

As ACCC chairman Rod Sims put it, “Google will not be required to charge Australians for the use of its free services such as Google Search and YouTube unless it chooses to do so”.

For context, Google collected $4.8 billion in revenue from Australia in 2019, including $4.3 billion in proceeds from digital advertising. It made $161 billion in revenue worldwide.

And, in January, Google’s parent company Alphabet became the fourth tech firm to reach a market cap of more than one trillion dollars.

CLAIM: “It will create an uneven playing field when it comes to who makes money on YouTube.”

FACT: YouTube is not mentioned in the draft law behind the news bargaining code.

The legislation lists Google Discover, News, and Search as “designated digital platform services,” along with Facebook’s News Feed, including Groups and Pages, Facebook’s forthcoming News Tab, and Instagram. YouTube is not named.

Google’s “uneven playing field” phrase might also sound familiar.

When announcing the news bargaining code, Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said it was designed to create a “level playing field” for digital platforms and Australian media businesses, which had been forced to work with them.

“It’s about a fair go for Australian news media businesses, it’s about ensuring that we have increased competition, increased consumer protection, and a sustainable media landscape,” Mr Frydenberg said.

CLAIM: “YouTube may be obligated to give large news publishers confidential information about our systems that they could use to try to appear higher in rankings on YouTube, disadvantaging all other creators. This would mean you receive fewer views and earn less.”

FACT: YouTube is not named in the draft law and does not fall under the news bargaining code.

CLAIM: “The law would force us to give an unfair advantage to one group of businesses – news media businesses – over everyone else who has a website, YouTube channel or small business. News media businesses alone would be given information that would help them artificially inflate their ranking over everyone else, even when someone else provides a better result.”

FACT: News companies will not be able to “game” Google’s algorithm to climb search rankings with information they receive under this new code of conduct.

Under the law, Google and Facebook would give registered news organisations 28 days’ notice of changes that would “significantly” affect the way their content would be presented online.

Last year, Google Australia managing director Mel Silva said it already provided news organisations with “extensive guidance on search ranking”.

Google could also choose to issue notice of these changes to other companies — or publicly publish them — to avoid favouring news organisations.

The news code would also require Facebook and Google to ensure they are “appropriately recognising original news content”. Google said it made changes to achieve that last year.

CLAIM: “We deeply believe in the importance of news to society. We partner closely with Australian news media businesses — we already pay them millions of dollars and send them billions of free clicks every year. We’ve offered to pay more to license content.”

FACT: Google announced a plan to pay some small Australian publishers for news content in June, just weeks before the announcement of the ACCC’s news bargaining code.

Critics branded the move an attempt to evade action widely anticipated from the competition watchdog.

Google has now suspended these deals with outlets including Crikey, The Saturday Paper, and InDaily.

Google says it sends news organisations “free clicks” by using their content on its platform; but that platform also uses the traffic it gets from listing news stories to sell millions of dollars in digital ads every year.


CLAIM: “Big news businesses can demand large amount of money above and beyond what they earn on the platform, leaving fewer funds to invest in you, our creators, and the programs to help you develop your audience in Australia and around the globe.”

FACT: Google and Facebook have three months to negotiate with media organisations to decide on payments for the content they create.

If the parties can’t agree, each will be asked to make a “final offer” on what they think is fair. An independent arbiter will decide which offer is the “most reasonable” within 45 days.

The model is designed to ensure both parties do not demand “above and beyond” what is fair.

CLAIM: “You trust us with your data and our job is to keep it safe. Under this law, Google has to tell news media businesses “how they can gain access” to data about your use of our products.”

FACT: Google and Facebook will be asked to share some data they collect from users but only about how they interact with news content.

The ACCC says this could include “how long users spend on an article, how many articles they consume in a certain time period” and other ways they use news content.

They will not be able to access users’ location data, internet search history, contact details, or information about their friends like digital platforms do.

Ref: news.com.au

 

There is much more to this, whats on the surface, its a public front! CIA's Google way over rate themselves!

For those that do not know, The ACCC is Australia's Watch Dog. Hey Google, woof! 

P.S: Yes I am getting the message:

Ref: Google's warning message.

 

Google's warning letter in PDF below:

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friends,

   Chris

Attached Files

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Chris posted this 18 August 2020

My Friends,

Google is doing a really good job at loosing friends:

 

Have a look at that! WOW they have really got their knickers in a knot! Spamming their users with multiple complaints on the same page! I think this is way beyond childish!

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friends,

   Chris

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Chris posted this 20 August 2020

My Friends,

It seems Google's total intelligence is fading very fast!

In the news again: ’It’s time to respect us: Google accused of bullying in new open letter about news code

blob:https://www.news.com.au/2c63d4ae-53ef-4af1-8fff-8058d66bdc8c

Yellow warning signs have suddenly appeared almost everywhere online, and Google has been accused of using them as a form of bullying.

Google has been slammed in a new open letter for its threats over a plan that would require it to pay for news.

The Australian Institute’s Centre for Responsible Technology has taken aim at Google today, labelling yellow warning signs on its website and its recent open letter against the plan as a form of bullying.

Google has activated the alerts in response to a draft code that would require Google and Facebook to pay media companies for their journalism.

“So maybe it’s time to respect us,” the open letter published in the Sydney Morning Herald on Thursday says.

“You are using your power as one of the largest companies on earth to threaten us. When we ask you to consider paying a fair amount for the journalism from which you benefit, you threaten to charge us for your search engine.”

It continues: “You have exploited your understanding of our personal interests and behaviours to draw advertisers away from traditional media, destroying the business model that supported independent journalism for more than 150 years.

“In the past decade, more than 5,000 Australian journalists have lost their jobs as your share of advertising has grown and grown.

“You have also been happy to use stories written by those journalists as if they were your own work, deriving value from something that isn’t yours.

It comes after Google hit back at Australia’s competition watchdog today after ACCC chairman Rod Sims, who criticised the company for spreading “misinformation” in its open letter to users.

Despite Google claiming Australian services were “at risk,” Mr Sims said the tech giant would not be “required to charge Australians for the use of its free services” under the proposed news bargaining code.

A Google spokesman appeared to rule out charging users today, instead claiming the code would “seriously damage our products and user experience”.

“We do not intend to charge users for our free services,” he said. “What we did say is that Search and YouTube, both of which are free services, are at risk in Australia. That’s because the code as it is drafted is unworkable.”

He said Google was concerned it would have to give registered news organisations advance warning of changes affecting their content, and to share data about how users interacted with news stories.

“This goes beyond the current level of data-sharing between Google and news publishers,” he said.

GOOGLE’S AUSSIE THREAT BLASTED

It comes as the tech giant is sends “warnings” to millions of Australians this week in what looks like the start of a fierce campaign against new rules that could force the firm to pay for the news it uses on its platform.

And the trillion-dollar company is making bold claims to users: alleging proposed laws from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will put everything from users’ privacy to the viability of Google’s free services at risk.

But ACCC chairman Rod Sims branded some of these warnings as “misinformation”.

We put these claims to the test against the draft legislation, and this is what you need to know about Google’s new “open letter” and what a news code would really mean for everyone.

Communications Minister Paul Fletcher has also blasted Google.

“One of the things that struck me was this item that pops up when you do a google search refers to the ‘big media’ companies,” he told Sky News host Peter Stefanovic on Tuesday.

“Now let’s get some numbers in this debate. Google has a market capitalisation of 1200 billion US dollars.

“The market capitalisation of News Corp – the biggest of the Australian news businesses – is $US9 billion. Nine Entertainment Ltd is $US2 billion.

“This language which attempts to characterise one side of this policy interaction as ‘big businesses’ – and by implication the other side not a big business, let’s be clear this is about the proper commercial terms for dealings between news media businesses.”

CLAIM: The ACCC news code could “put the free services you use at risk in Australia”.

FACT: Only Google can set the price of its products and services in Australia and elsewhere.

As ACCC chairman Rod Sims put it, “Google will not be required to charge Australians for the use of its free services such as Google Search and YouTube unless it chooses to do so”.

For context, Google collected $4.8 billion in revenue from Australia in 2019, including $4.3 billion in proceeds from digital advertising. It made $161 billion in revenue worldwide.

And, in January, Google’s parent company Alphabet became the fourth tech firm to reach a market cap of more than one trillion dollars.

CLAIM: “It will create an uneven playing field when it comes to who makes money on YouTube.”

FACT: YouTube is not mentioned in the draft law behind the news bargaining code.

The legislation lists Google Discover, News, and Search as “designated digital platform services,” along with Facebook’s News Feed, including Groups and Pages, Facebook’s forthcoming News Tab, and Instagram. YouTube is not named.

Google’s “uneven playing field” phrase might also sound familiar.

When announcing the news bargaining code, Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said it was designed to create a “level playing field” for digital platforms and Australian media businesses, which had been forced to work with them.

“It’s about a fair go for Australian news media businesses, it’s about ensuring that we have increased competition, increased consumer protection, and a sustainable media landscape,” Mr Frydenberg said.

CLAIM: “YouTube may be obligated to give large news publishers confidential information about our systems that they could use to try to appear higher in rankings on YouTube, disadvantaging all other creators. This would mean you receive fewer views and earn less.”

FACT: YouTube is not named in the draft law and does not fall under the news bargaining code.

CLAIM: “The law would force us to give an unfair advantage to one group of businesses – news media businesses – over everyone else who has a website, YouTube channel or small business. News media businesses alone would be given information that would help them artificially inflate their ranking over everyone else, even when someone else provides a better result.”

FACT: News companies will not be able to “game” Google’s algorithm to climb search rankings with information they receive under this new code of conduct.

Under the law, Google and Facebook would give registered news organisations 28 days’ notice of changes that would “significantly” affect the way their content would be presented online.

Last year, Google Australia managing director Mel Silva said it already provided news organisations with “extensive guidance on search ranking”.

Google could also choose to issue notice of these changes to other companies — or publicly publish them — to avoid favouring news organisations.

The news code would also require Facebook and Google to ensure they are “appropriately recognising original news content”. Google said it made changes to achieve that last year.

CLAIM: “We deeply believe in the importance of news to society. We partner closely with Australian news media businesses — we already pay them millions of dollars and send them billions of free clicks every year. We’ve offered to pay more to license content.”

FACT: Google announced a plan to pay some small Australian publishers for news content in June, just weeks before the announcement of the ACCC’s news bargaining code.

Critics branded the move an attempt to evade action widely anticipated from the competition watchdog.

Google has now suspended these deals with outlets including Crikey, The Saturday Paper, and InDaily.

Google says it sends news organisations “free clicks” by using their content on its platform; but that platform also uses the traffic it gets from listing news stories to sell millions of dollars in digital ads every year.


CLAIM: “Big news businesses can demand large amount of money above and beyond what they earn on the platform, leaving fewer funds to invest in you, our creators, and the programs to help you develop your audience in Australia and around the globe.”

FACT: Google and Facebook have three months to negotiate with media organisations to decide on payments for the content they create.

If the parties can’t agree, each will be asked to make a “final offer” on what they think is fair. An independent arbiter will decide which offer is the “most reasonable” within 45 days.

The model is designed to ensure both parties do not demand “above and beyond” what is fair.

CLAIM: “You trust us with your data and our job is to keep it safe. Under this law, Google has to tell news media businesses “how they can gain access” to data about your use of our products.”

FACT: Google and Facebook will be asked to share some data they collect from users but only about how they interact with news content.

The ACCC says this could include “how long users spend on an article, how many articles they consume in a certain time period” and other ways they use news content.

They will not be able to access users’ location data, internet search history, contact details, or information about their friends like digital platforms do.

 

I don't get it! If Google really has such a problem, and its not guilty, just pull the plug! Why carry on like a bunch of spoiled children?

I have never been witness to such juvenile behaviour by a Tech Giant! How embarrassing for Google! History will Judge your actions as we move forward Google!

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friends,

   Chris

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Zanzal posted this 20 August 2020

I'm not sure why any people would be in support of government regulation that required organizations like google to turn over records about user consumption of their products. But google's probably just annoyed they can't charge for the info. They certainly collect it and its most certainly available to purchase.

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Chris posted this 20 August 2020

Hey Zanzal,

Yeah Google is annoyed, that's for sure. There is lots going on! They are in a fair bit of trouble over here! Lots of accusations all of which are damaging to say the least!

I think Google should pay, I mean they take, other sites information, news articles with no payment for example!

Google expect you as a web dev to have non-plagiarised information on your web pages, and if you copy other sites, they penalise you for it! Yet its ok for them to plagiarise other sites information! Hypocritical to say the least!

Lots going on here, and lots google has to answer for!

What worries me the most is Google's Miss-Information! This accusation is very distressing! For the Australian Government to make this accusation, we have big problems! Normally, our government would not do or say much!

If Google is lying to us all, then you can put money down the others are also doing it! Most of us are well aware of this already!

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friend,

   Chris

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Augenblick posted this 20 August 2020

This may become the general trend for everything we experience, except for a walk in the pasture:

It seems Google's total intelligence is fading very fast!

As the seasoned operators of corporations retire, or are forced out by Millenials with misanthropic leanings, you will notice that logic, intelligence and thematic integrity have been cast away for petty grievances and misguided social justice issues.

In the past several years you may have noticed that most television series have been derailed by illogical twists or discontinuation of the original story lines. The Marvel series are good example. All have been transformed into blatant social propaganda machines.

Corporations like Nike, Gillette, Goodyear ... now driven by millennial drama queens ... losing a long standing respect for product quality. Does one want to buy a product that focuses attention to 'matters' outside manufacturing? Does my purchase of personal or safety products always have to incorporate virtue signalling? ... orchestrated by reactive misanthropic shills? ... that despise me for buying their products?

Do you trust that the server at McDonalds, Starbucks, or Dunkin Donuts wont defile your foodstuff somehow because s/he is triggered by your race, age, clothing or casual conversation? This happens all too often. One should know their service provider and exchange convenience/preference for an essential vigilance.

The downfall of these large conglomerates will be at the hands of the microcultures that force their unworkable ideologies on fellow (productive) laborers. Once those workers leave, the Mills will turn to ignorant slave labor, to maintain their perverse agendas.

How long before the sensible public turns away from FaceBook, Google, YouTube, etc., and gets back to business? Why be partners with entities that despise our freedoms?

-A-

... in the blink of an eye.

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cd_sharp posted this 20 August 2020

Hey, guys

I've been using DuckDuckGo for the last few days and I can say it replaces Google Search well enough.

Youtube is next. One question, can I embed videos from Dailymotion in a forum post? How?

"It's just the knowledge of the coils and how they interact with each other" (Steven Mark)

Augenblick posted this 20 August 2020

CD, I agree, DuckDuckGo is a reasonable substitute, but leaves out a few things that Google might find. Still, it's a better replacement.

This article exemplifies the transitioning of corporate wisdom to reactionary chaos:

https://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/goodyear-clarifies-policy-maga-police-trump-boycott

It appears that the free expression gag order

... was not approved or distributed by Goodyear Corporate or anyone outside of that facility.,

yet it was presented internally to the workers as part of their training.

The slide listed “Black Lives Matter” and “LGBT” under acceptable phrases, while the Trump slogan “Make America Great Again” and the pro-police slogan “Blue Lives Matter” were listed under unacceptable phrases.

-A-

 

... in the blink of an eye.

Chris posted this 20 August 2020

My Friends,

Never before have we seen such Pre-Election Blues! Crazy behaviour from so many Crazy people and Corporates! This is beyond Crazy! This behaviour is psychopathic!

We need to anaylse, from a distance, who is going crazy and what they are doing!

What happens in the US affects the rest of the world, some much more so than others! We here in Australia are very closely aligned with the US. Our economy is based on the US Economy.

Corporates show their cards when they behave like lunatics and we are seeing so many behave like lunatics! Especially when the Economies are starting to go back up now, the V is kicking in and hopefully, we can keep that trend going!

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friends,

   Chris

Chris posted this 21 August 2020

My Friends,

As this whole saga unfolds, its get more and more unfavorable for Google:

Google threatens Australian YouTube users with loss of income

Google has targeted its top YouTube stars with yellow warning signs online, with claims they could “earn less” and it may have “fewer funds to invest” in them.

 

Google is targeting its top YouTube stars with warnings they could “earn less” and the trillion-dollar firm may have “fewer funds to invest” in them if changes to make the company pay for the news it uses in Australia go ahead.

But experts branded the messages as “misinformation” and a “desperate attempt” to rally support for the company, as YouTube is not mentioned in the proposed laws and would not be subject to revenue-sharing changes in the proposal from Australia’s competition watchdog.

Google’s new messages come days after the tech giant kicked off an aggressive online campaign against the Australian laws, advertising an “open letter” to millions of users on its Australian search page, and warning the reform would “hurt the Google you use every day”.

In the new emails, Google told YouTube users the legal changes would give news organisations information they could use to game rankings, meaning “you could receive fewer views and earn less”.

Google also appeared to cry poor, warning that Australian news outlets could “demand large amounts of money above and beyond what they earn on the platform, leaving fewer funds to invest in you, our creators”.

The company also issued a video message from YouTube Creator liaison Matt Koval, who said the video-sharing platform would have to change its Australian operations and encouraged users to share how the laws could “negatively impact” them with the Government.

“As it stands, if this becomes law, we wouldn’t be able to operate in Australia in our current form,” he said. “We’d have to make major changes to YouTube. But, again, we don’t want it to get to that point.”

Google is warning YouTube users of risks to their content. Picture: AFP
Google is warning YouTube users of risks to their content. Picture: AFPSource:AFP

But Australian Competition and Consumer Commission chairman Rod Sims referred back to comments he made about Google’s open letter earlier this week, in which he said the letter contained “misinformation about the draft news media bargaining code”.

Mr Sims said the code was designed to “address a significant bargaining power imbalance” between Google and Facebook and Australian news outlets, and would not require Google to “share any additional user data” or “charge Australians for the use of its free services such as Google Search and YouTube”.

“We will continue to consult on the draft code with interested parties, including Google,” he said.

The ACCC’s draft news bargaining code recommended tech giants share revenue obtained “directly or indirectly” from news content used on their sites, and warn media companies about “significant” changes to the way their content was shown.

It does not mention YouTube as one of the platforms affected by negotiations over payment, and its current revenue arrangements would not be impacted by the proposed changes.

The legislation lists Google Discover, News, and Search as “designated digital platform services,” along with Facebook’s News Feed, including Groups and Pages, Facebook’s forthcoming News Tab, and Instagram.

The warning given out by Google.
The warning given out by Google.Source:Supplied

Swinburne University social media senior lecturer Dr Belinda Barnet said the messages appeared to be “complete misinformation” given YouTube was not mentioned in the code.

She said Google’s new messages were an attempt to rally YouTube users to the company’s cause with frightening messages that were different to the warnings they show to Google search users.

“It’s threatening (YouTubers&rsquo actual income and ranking, which is important to them,” Dr Barnet said. “The argument is tweaked to appeal to the worst fears of YouTube’s users.

“The whole thing is a fairly desperate campaign because they have no other option. Their argument hasn’t succeeded and the code is on its way to becoming mandatory.”

If the code is passed, Australia could be the first country in which Google and Facebook share revenue with media organisations from the use of their content.

Dr Barnet said Google’s new messages to YouTube users also made frequent references to big and powerful news companies even though the code was designed to “benefit far more than just the big players in Australia”.

“This is a trillion-dollar company saying we’re going to be too poor, and if this legislation goes through we’re just not going to have enough money to pay you,” she said. “It makes me angry that they’re allowed to do this.”

The ACCC will accept submissions on the news bargaining code until August 28.

 

De-Funding Aussies, hahaha Google must be desperate!

This is a bit of Karma:

Google suffers Gmail and Drive outage worldwide after a week of Australian controversy

After warning Australian users about ‘risks’ to its services, Google appears to be suffering an unrelated online outage affecting millions of users.

IT’S not just you: Gmail and at least nine other Google apps went down this week.

After days of warning Australians that Google services were “at risk” over law reform, the company appeared to suffer an unrelated worldwide outage for many of its biggest services on Thursday, affecting millions of users.

The disruption lasted for more than seven hours before it was fully rectified after 9pm last night, impacting peak work times for countries across the globe.

Gmail users began reporting problems with the email service shortly before 2pm, suffering intermittent issues when sending and receiving mail, logging in and attaching files, according to DownDetector.

About 20 minutes later, more problems were reported with Google’s cloud storage service Drive, which stopped accepting file uploads.

Other Google services to stop working during the outage included Groups, Chat, Meet, Docs, Slides, Keep, Sites and Google Voice.

Technical issues recorded included issues creating files in Drive, posting messages in Google Chat, and recording in Meet.

The problems even impacted YouTube users, with the company’s video team noting that they were “experiencing some delays in video uploads processing”.

The technology giant did not issue an official statement on the cause of the problem yesterday, only noting on its service dashboard that the issues were resolved at 9.10pm.

“We apologise for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience and continued support,” a note on Google’s outage page said.

“System reliability is a top priority at Google. We are making continuous improvements to make our systems better.”

The tech giant has yet to reveal the cause of the damaging outage, which some called its largest in 16 years.

Hacking has not been tipped but some reports point to issues with software updates and the return of US schools.

Google’s technical problems came just days after the trillion-dollar tech giant started issuing “warnings” to Australians about the availability of its services in Australia after the country’s competition watchdog ruled it should pay for the news it uses on its platform.

In an “open letter” to users advertised on its main search page and in pop-up messages on YouTube, the company said proposed laws to see it share revenue generated from news content used on its platform would put its “free services at risk”.

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission chairman Rod Sims said Google’s letter contained “misinformation,” however, and only it could set a price for its services.

 

Winning any Friends Google? I don't think so!

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friends,

   Chris

Chris posted this 4 weeks ago

My Friends;

This is a big one: DOJ To File Antitrust Charges Against Google Within Weeks

The Department of Justice will is preparing to slap Google with an antitrust case over the next several weeks, according to the New York Times - which insists, based on five sources, that Attorney General Bill Barr "overruled career lawyers who said they needed more time to build a strong case against one of the world’s wealthiest, most formidable technology companies."

The Timeis suggesting, based on leaks, that Barr is rushing the case for political purposes and the charges are premature.

The Google case could also give Mr. Trump and Mr. Barr an election-season achievement on an issue that both Democrats and Republicans see as a major problem: the influence of the biggest tech companies over consumers and the possibility that their business practices have stifled new competitors and hobbled legacy industries like telecom and media. -NYT

 

Some 40 lawyers working on a DOJ antitrust inquiry into Google parent Alphabet were reportedly told to wrap up their work by the end of this month, according to three of the five leakers, who we're guessing are part of the 40-lawyer team - as "most of the 40-odd lawyers who had been working on the investigation opposed the deadline." Others said they would not sign the complaint, while several left the case over the summer.

Some argued this summer in a memo that ran hundreds of pages that they could bring a strong case but needed more time, according to people who described the document. Disagreement persisted among the team over how broad the complaint should be and what Google could do to resolve the problems the government uncovered. The lawyers viewed the deadline as arbitrary.

While there were disagreements about tactics, career lawyers also expressed concerns that Mr. Barr wanted to announce the case in September to take credit for action against a powerful tech company under the Trump administration.

But Mr. Barr felt that the department had moved too slowly and that the deadline was not unreasonable, according to a senior Justice Department official. -NYT

 

Barr has shown a "deep interest" in the Google investigation, requesting regular briefings on the DOJ case, and "taking thick binders of information about it on trips and vacations and returning with ideas and notes."

The Times notes that antitrust action against Google has bipartisan support from a coalition of 50 states and territories, though Democrats and Republican state attorneys general conducting their own investigations are split on how to move forward.

Republicans have accused Democrats of slow-walking the work in order to bring charges under a potential Biden administration, while Democrats have accused Republicans of wanting Trump to receive credit - a disagreement which could limit the number of states participating in prosecuting the Silicon Valley giant.

MORE IN THE ABOVE LINK...

 

Google just migh become a Government owned Company! Wow this is a big step in the Fake News area!

Best wishes, stay safe and well My Friends,

Chris

 

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Weeks High Earners:
The great Nikola Tesla:

Ere many generations pass, our machinery will be driven by a power obtainable at any point of the universe. This idea is not novel. Men have been led to it long ago go by instinct or reason. It has been expressed in many ways, and in many places, in the history of old and new. We find it in the delightful myth of Antheus, who drives power from the earth; we find it among the subtle speculations of one of your splendid mathematicians, and in many hints and statements of thinkers of the present time. Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic? If static, our hopes are in vain; if kinetic - and this we know it is for certain - then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature.

Experiments With Alternate Currents Of High Potential And High Frequency (February 1892).

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